Volume 11, Issue 4 p. 251-256
Original Research

Real-time patient experience surveys of hospitalized medical patients

Kimberly Indovina MD

Kimberly Indovina MD

Division of Hospital Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

Department of Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO

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Angela Keniston MSPH

Angela Keniston MSPH

Department of Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

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Mark Reid MD

Mark Reid MD

Division of Hospital Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

Department of Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO

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Katherine Sachs MD

Katherine Sachs MD

Division of Hospital Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

Department of Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO

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Chi Zheng MD

Chi Zheng MD

Division of Hospital Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

Department of Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO

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Angie Tong BS

Angie Tong BS

Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center, Denver, Colorado

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Danny Hernandez BS

Danny Hernandez BS

University of Colorado, Auraria Campus, Denver, Colorado

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Kathy Bui BS

Kathy Bui BS

University of Colorado, Auraria Campus, Denver, Colorado

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Zeinab Ali

Zeinab Ali

University of Colorado, Auraria Campus, Denver, Colorado

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Thao Nguyen BS

Thao Nguyen BS

University of Colorado, Auraria Campus, Denver, Colorado

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Helpees Guirguis BS

Helpees Guirguis BS

University of Colorado, Auraria Campus, Denver, Colorado

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Richard K. Albert MD

Richard K. Albert MD

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO

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Marisha Burden MD

Corresponding Author

Marisha Burden MD

Division of Hospital Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

Department of Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO

Address for correspondence and reprint requests: Marisha A. Burden, MD, Denver Health, 777 Bannock, MC 4000, Denver, CO 80204-4507; Telephone: 303-436-7124; Fax: 303-602-5057; E-mail: [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
First published: 18 January 2016
Citations: 35

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Real-time feedback about patients' perceptions of the quality of the care they are receiving could provide physicians the opportunity to address concerns and improve these perceptions as they occur, but physicians rarely if ever receive feedback from patients in real time.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate if real-time patient feedback to physicians improves patient experience.

DESIGN

Prospective, randomized, quality-improvement initiative.

SETTING

University-affiliated, public safety net hospital.

PARTICIPANTS

Patients and hospitalist physicians on general internal medicine units.

INTERVENTION

Real-time daily patient feedback to providers along with provider coaching and revisits of patients not reporting optimal satisfaction with their care.

MEASUREMENTS

Patient experience scores on 3 provider-specific questions from daily surveys on all patients and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores and percentiles on randomly selected patients.

RESULTS

Changes in HCAHPS percentile ranks were substantial (communication from doctors: 60th percentile versus 39th, courtesy and respect of doctors: 88th percentile versus 23rd, doctors listening carefully to patients: 95th percentile versus 57th, and overall hospital rating: 87th percentile versus 6th (P = 0.02 for overall differences in percentiles), but we found no statistically significant difference in the top box proportions for the daily surveys or the HCAHPS survey. The median [interquartile range] top box score for the overall hospital rating question on the HCAHPS survey was higher in the intervention group than in the control group (10 [9, 10] vs 9 [8, 10], P = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS

Real-time feedback, followed by coaching and patient revisits, seem to improve patient experience. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:251–256. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine